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KING BOGUS,
THE MONARCH

-Article By Garcia Jackson

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How was it working with Lil Baby and YK Osiris?

 

Interesting enough, I met them before they reached these heights that they are at now. I'm really proud of them. I say that to say working with them was a really smooth process. I was talking to people I had worked with before and we made some good records. I appreciate those records for the opportunities they gave me. 

 

Your song For The 9er has a laid back feel with the ride around vibe, it definitely has that Savannah feel. Do you consider yourself a non aggressive artist?

 

I'm definitely not an aggressive artist. There is enough of that already isn't there? I am agressive when it comes to proving my worth or my lyrical ability, but at the end of the day I'm just a chill guy who has bars. I just speak on what I know. I know when to be aggressive and I'm not a push over; non agressive sounds too passive though. I'm not a pacifist, but I don't look for trouble. 

 

Where can people find your music?

 

I am on all streaming platforms. I'm really heavy on Spotify. I have music videos on YouTube as well. Some of my more exclusive music is on SoundCloud. All of my music can be found under the name King Bogus, The Monarch. You can even Google me!!

 

Where do you see yourself as a music artist in 5 years?

 

In 5 years I see myself dealing with the outpour of positive reviews from my second album. I see myself being a force in the industry, after finishing a hefty run of features I would start to scout for talent in the city of Savannah in hopes to fully make The 9er a viable label with a great stable of local artists who deserve to be heard. I would also like The 9er to be a vessel that gives back to the community. 

 

 

Do you like to be in the studio making a song, or being on stage performing the song?

 

It definitely depends on the song. I think my more R&B type songs I definitely enjoyed recording it more. I could be as vulnerable as I wanted to be. When it comes to my more upbeat or even lyrical songs I love performing those more because I love seeing and hearing the audience react to my music. Whether it be a punch line or a flow, it definitely lights a fire in me.

What got you into music, hip hop specifically?

 

My grandparents passed back to back to back in 2003. I was just in the 5th grade and didn't have anywhere to put my feelings. I didn't even really have anyone to talk to. I started writing my feelings down as poetry making sure I was rhyming every line because that's what I thought you had to do. I was surrounded by HipHop growing up whether it be my dad playing Tupac or Mystikal in the car or my brother playing his music( Jay-Z, Eminem, Bad Boy, or some Underground artists I can't remember)loud enough to hear. So I think it just naturally evolved into me rapping over beats. First beat I really wrote to though was that Busta Rhymes Touch it. 

 

Some of your music such as "Weight Up" Featuring Summer Walker has the conscious laid back burning incense vibe, how are you able to come up with such a laid back vibe?

 

I like those vibes because I can really stretch lyrically and content wise on them. I think it's important not to lose the spectrum of music. Also, honestly, I'm a laid back person. I like to chill, smoke and make music. I think a lot of that comes out in the songs. Life is too short to be uptight. The vibe doesn't always have to be for a club or a party. If it is though, we gonna have a good time. That's for sure.

 

 

Being a Savannah, GA native, how were you able to fit in to the new Atlanta style of music and its new diversity vs. the old Atlanta?

 

Even though I am from Savannah, my music and my style is definitely unique. I think that's what helped me succeed in Atlanta. I made a lot of connections based off of my sound and style being unique. Even if you are in Savannah no one sounds like me. Even now I don't think I really "fit in" to Atlanta's style of music, I think my sound is just so unique, and Atlanta is so welcoming and open, and that's why I am appreciated. I am very appreciative of the appreciation as well especially since I am a Savannah artist!!! 

 

You bring a totally different image to music, most artists wear hip hop attire, you wear quality suits, what gave you the ambition to switch your style?

 

I think my style is influenced by the pioneers of Jazz, but I've added my own Regal flair to it of course. I still wear HipHop attire too, I just feel like why not wear a suit you know? Why is it so jarring? You know back in the days of jazz and blues and such that's all people used to wear. I actually had to perform in a suit a few times because of my classes at Morehouse. You just realize that now we only "dress up" on special occasions and I don't know it just made me think why? Especially when everytime we step out we stand out you know? So I started rocking the suits and the slacks with the blazers. I realized how jarring it was for people to see that with my style of music so I just kept it going. 

 

Talk a little about the 9er?

 The 9er stands for The 912 which is the area code for Savannah. That's where I got the name from at least. The 9er is a label and creative collective. The 9er is my home away from home too. I want it to become this extension of the city. 

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-By Sandra Billups, DYME Magazine